Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts today announced its ‘Sustainable Seafood Policy’ including the commitment to cease serving shark fin in all of its operated restaurants as well as accepting new orders for shark fin products in banqueting with immediate effect.

Congratulations to these guys! A BIG hotel chain based in Hong Kong and throughout the Asia region!

Shangri-La Announces Sustainable Seafood Policy And Discontinuing Use Of All Shark Fin Products in 72 hotels and resorts
17 Jan 2012
Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts today announced its ‘Sustainable Seafood Policy’ including the commitment to cease serving shark fin in all of its operated restaurants as well as accepting new orders for shark fin products in banqueting with immediate effect.

Future banquet bookings made prior to this date will be honoured as per the signed contractual agreement. At the same time, Shangri-La announced that it will phase out Bluefin tuna and Chilean sea bass in all its operated restaurants within the year. In December 2010 the company initiated the process with the removal of shark fin products from its restaurant menus. The new policy is a continuation of Shangri-La’s journey towards environmental support.

The company launched its first CSR initiatives in 2005 which were streamlined and formalised in 2009 in the three main areas of Sustainability, Embrace and Sanctuary towards a strategic commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility.

‘Sanctuary, Shangri-La’s Care for Nature’ project was introduced specifically to ensure consistency in biodiversity, conservation and habitat protection across all resorts. Projects include the development of marine sanctuaries to ensure reef protection and stability of the underwater and marine life. Two years later, in May 2011, the company published its first Sustainability Report outlining the company’s progress in the areas of environment, health and safety, employees, supply chain and stakeholder relations.

Shangri-La’s ethos and core values show a commitment to the environment that the company does business in. As part of the CSR efforts, Shangri-La has been working on a number of projects related to sustainability for several years. The sustainable seafood campaign has been on the forefront as the initiative will deliver immediate results.

Shangri-La will continue to review and refine its overall programmes including environmental and sustainability issues.


Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts today announced its ‘Sustainable Seafood Policy’ including the commitment to cease serving shark fin in all of its operated restaurants as well as accepting new orders for shark fin products in banqueting with immediate effect

Sunday, December 11, 2011

The Mango Café

The renovated premises of The Mango Café are a vast improvement over the old cafe: 2 stories now, air-conditioned, with a pleasant balcony along one side, and lots of glass and light. The atmosphere is relaxed and informal; the decor: muted.


Mango café offers breakfast, lunch and dinner menus ... and a sandwich bar. Whilst we've tried the lunch menu (the burgers and pasta dishes are good), this review is mainly concerned with their all-day breakfast menu.

Lunch in Suva: The Mango Café

Friday, April 15, 2011

Fijian Food from Market to Table | Culinary Colorado

Lautoka market vendors sells the foods that Bulou cooks with total authenticity

The market of Lautoka, a town diagonally across Fiji’s Viti Levu island from the capital at Suva, exerted a magnetic on me and my four colleagues heading to Bulou’s Eco-Resort.

We stopped “for 10 minutes” and reluctantly emerged something like 40 minutes later, having met vendors (“Bula!” was a welcome not to encourage us to buy), gazed a familiar and unfamiliar produce and were told what this or that root vegetable was called and perhaps how it was prepared.

This enormous mostly-indoor market is open daily except Sunday. Most vendors have tables, but others sell off blankets on the edge of the hall or outside. I have heard that it is Fiji’s largest market — and if it, I’m guessing it’s close to the biggest. Below are some market images, mostly uncaptioned because even stretching our10-minute plan, we moved too fast for photos and notes.

Full article here: Fijian Food from Market to Table | Culinary Colorado

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Recipes of Fiji, Food of Fiji

In general, native Fijians and the Fijian-Indian populations use their hands to eat. Meals are eaten on the floor while the family sits on mats. If you make a Fijian meal to share this month, consider incorporating these eating customs into your meal plan.

Common food of Fiji:
Rice, taro, breadfruit, sweet potatoes, cassava, fish & coconut

Lovo

A communal village feast for special occasions such as weddings, festivals or the inauguration of a new chief. Lovo is prepared by digging a large pit and lining it with dry coconut husks. The husks are set on fire, then stones are heaped on top. When the flames from the coconut husks die down, the food is wrapped in banana leaves and lowered into the pit. Meat and fish are always put in first, and the vegetables are put on top. Everything is covered with more banana leaves and stones and left to cook for about 2 ½ hours. When it’s ready, it’s a feast for all!

Recipes of Fiji, Food of Fiji: "- Sent using Google Toolbar"

Friday, May 14, 2010

Food and Recipes of Fiji

In general, native Fijians and the Fijian-Indian populations use their hands to eat. Meals are eaten on the floor while the family sits on mats. If you make a Fijian meal to share this month, consider incorporating these eating customs into your meal plan.

Common food of Fiji:
Rice, taro, breadfruit, sweet potatoes, cassava, fish & coconut

Lovo

A communal village feast for special occasions such as weddings, festivals or the inauguration of a new chief. Lovo is prepared by digging a large pit and lining it with dry coconut husks. The husks are set on fire, then stones are heaped on top. When the flames from the coconut husks die down, the food is wrapped in banana leaves and lowered into the pit. Meat and fish are always put in first, and the vegetables are put on top. Everything is covered with more banana leaves and stones and left to cook for about 2 ½ hours. When it’s ready, it’s a feast for all!

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Maya Dhaba Review at Frommer's

This chic, noisy Victoria Parade bistro is Suva's hottest and most urbane restaurant. Regardless of ethnicity, local couples and families all flock here for authentic Indian fare at extraordinarily reasonable prices. The menu runs the gamut of the Subcontinent, from Punjabi tandoori chicken tikka to huge vegetarian masala dosa (rice-flour pancakes wrapped crepelike around potato curry) from Madras. In fact, vegetarians will have many choices here. My old standby, butter chicken, has a wonderful smoked flavor here. Little guess work is required since the menu explains every dish.


Maya Dhaba Review at Frommer's

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Ashiyana Restaurants in Suva - Lonely Planet Travel Information

Lonely Planet review

For an Indian feast in more refined surrounds, Ashiyana is a step up in atmosphere and style from the curry houses and serves good thali and tandoori dishes.

The spicy curries here are legendary - even the taxi drivers consider them hot.

Ashiyana Restaurants in Suva - Lonely Planet Travel Information

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

The Bounty Bar & Restaurant

The Bounty is located on the Queen's Road in Martintar, Nadi. It is close to the Nadi International Airport and a close taxi drive from most hotels and resorts in the Nadi region.

They offer International cuisine with Fijian specials.

Great place to eat and drink with many local dropping in after work.

Opening hours are from 9am till 10pm.

Phone 672 0840

The Bounty Bar & Restaurant - Nadi Fiji Resorts and Hotel Accommodation News

Saturday, June 13, 2009

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Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Recipes of Fiji, Food of Fiji : Kokoda

A traditional Fijian dish that tastes much better than it sounds. The traditional dish is prepared with mahi-mahi; we used halibut, but you can use white fish of your choice. Again, very simple to prepare – just be sure to leave enough time to marinate the fish in the lime. You’ll need a minimum of 6 hours.Kokoda Recipe

Ingredients
2 White Fish Fillets
Juice from 3 large limes
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 cup Coconut Cream (be sure to use the cream and not the milk)
1 Onion, finely chopped
1 hot pepper, deseeded and finely chopped
2 Tomatoes, deseeded and finely chopped

Directions

1. Cut the fish into bite-size pieces and place in a glass or plastic bowl (avoid metal as it will react with the lime juice and ruin your dish) Add the lime juice and salt. Mix well, cover and marinate in fridge for 6-10 hours.

2. Just before serving, add coconut cream, onion, and the pepper. Stir thoroughly then place onto serving platter using slotted spoon. Top with chopped tomatoes and serve with a flourish.



Recipes of Fiji, Food of Fiji